The Auto-Lock Family Keeps Growing!

We’ve recently introduced the Auto-Lock® in colors, vibrant red, green, and blue!

Now, this time, we’re bringing in the Auto-Lock® with angles! Not only can you color code your devices, but you can also organize even better with these angled jumper cords.

The Auto-Lock® now comes in several angled cord configurations, shown in the tables below.

C13 Auto-Lock®

The first configuration in the standard IEC C14 to IEC C13 Auto-Lock® jumper cable. You can choose between 10 Amps to 15 Amps depending on the amount of power you need. These Auto-Lock cords are used in network applications such as servers and PDU’s.

ANGLED SERIES
up 6280 AL
down 4929 AL
left 5244 AL
right 3514 AL

 

c13 up angle c13 down angle
c13 left angle c13 right angle

Continue reading The Auto-Lock Family Keeps Growing!

Coiled VS. Coiled

Picture this: you’re in need of some power cords. You call Quail Electronics requesting a coiled cord. The sales representative asks you, “would you like a coiled cord or for your cords to be packaged in a coiled form?” Well, now you’re confused, thinking ‘what’s the difference?’ Today I will be explaining coiled vs. coiled.

First, we have coiled as in the way it’s packaged. For example, you can have your cords packaged in a form which can either be hanked (often described as a figure 8 wrapping) see Image 1,   hanked

OR you can have them coiled as a “loop,” as shown in Image 2image 2

Continue reading Coiled VS. Coiled

The Difference between C13 and C15

The power cord industry can be confusing. But the more you know, the better. Today we will discuss the differences between IEC-C13 and C15 connectors.

First, the obvious difference is the notch on the C15 connector. It is similar in form to the C13, except with a notch opposite the earth in the C15 connector. IEC-C15 connectors will work in the C14 inlets however,
IEC-C13 connectors won’t fit into C16 inlets. Think of it like this: an electric kettle cord can be used to power a computer, but an unmodified computer cord cannot be used to power the kettle.

c13blog      c15blog

Second, the Ic15bloggEC-C15 differs from the C13 because of the temperature rating. These C15 connectors are specifically designed for higher temperature devices, for example: electric kettles, computing networking closets or server rooms, and PoE (Power over Ethernet) switches with higher wattage power supplies. The temperature rating for these connectors is 120°C. Continue reading The Difference between C13 and C15

Universal 3500 series is now Approved for China!

Universal Approved for China

Universal approvedUniversal 3500 series is now approved for China. We’re happy to announce the new CCC approval. At the moment, Quail Electronics offers the IEC-C14 to IEC-C13 jumpers on the market to be internationally and domestically approved. However, our 3500 series power cord now carries UL, C-UL, VDE and China’s CCC approval. That means you can take it all over North America, Europe and China without ever having to switch a thing. Travel the globe with our 3500 series!

How to Crimp Terminals

I bet you’re wondering what an electrical terminal is. A terminal is the point at which the conductor of an electrical component comes to an end and provides connection to external circuits.

And how do we crimp terminals, you ask?
Let me explain. The word crimping, in this context, means to combine two pieces of metal together by deforming one (or both) to hold the other. It’s called “crimp” because of the deformity.

You’ll need a crimping tool in order to correctly crimp connectors onto the wire. Please remember that pliers are NOT crimpers! To verify that you have the right crimper, the crimper Continue reading How to Crimp Terminals

Electric Vehicle Part 1

EV plug 1

Electric vehicles have become a way of life. To prove that is true is the new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard put into place by the Obama Administration. By 2025, every new vehicle sold in the United States will need to reach at least 54.5 mpg. In order to operate, the plug-in hybrid EVs that function on batteries need to be charged occasionally. No more trips to the over-populated, busy gas stations. You can fill up right at home overnight or at work during the day. The car simply plugs in while it is immobile for a given period of time. It can also charge while being driven – once the car is coming to a stop and the brakes are applied, kinetic energy is transformed into chemical energy in the battery.

In order to operate, the plug-in hybrid EVs that function on batteries need to be charged occasionally. No more trips to the over-populated, busy gas stations. You can fill up right at home overnight or at work during the day. The car simply plugs in while it is immobile for a given period of time. It can also charge while being driven – once the car is coming to a stop and the brakes are applied, kinetic energy is transformed into chemical energy in the battery.

Continue reading Electric Vehicle Part 1

How an Electrical Cable is made

The world of electricity can be very complicated. But what about electricity do we in fact know? Well, we do know electrical cables are designed to carry current from one element to another. What we DON’T know is how an electrical cable is even made. Of course, as always, I am here to help with any confusion!

An electrical cable consists of conductors, which is an uninsulated wiHow an electrical cable is made 1re suitable for carrying electrical current. Electrical conductors are made up of metals such as, copper, aluminum, etc. Most wires are made out of copper because it conducts electricity with high flexibility and very little resistance.

Electrical wires come in solid core, stranded, or braided together to form a single assembly, where the ends connect to two devices, therefore, allowing the electrical signals to transfer from one device to the other. Continue reading How an Electrical Cable is made